Meet The Most Beautiful Girl In Zimbabwe (Opinion) - Mc Ebisco Meet The Most Beautiful Girl In Zimbabwe (Opinion) - Mc Ebisco
Lifestyle

Meet The Most Beautiful Girl In Zimbabwe (Opinion)

Get 10G Free For Glo, MTN & Airtel For Today Now

Meet the most beautiful girl in Zimbabwe

Dear Deeply Readers, Welcome to the archives of Women’s Advancement Deeply. While we paused regular publication of the site on November 15, 2018, we are happy to serve as an ongoing public resource on women’s economic advancement. We hope you’ll enjoy the reporting and analysis that was produced by our dedicated community of editors and contributors. We continue to produce events and special projects while we explore where the on-site journalism goes next. If you’d like to reach us with feedback or ideas for collaboration you can do so at .

Meet a few of our Scholars 2020 Tuesday, December 3, 2019 Canon Collins typically emails its acceptance letters, but this time around we thought we would do something a little different (with permission from the scholars). We informed a few over skype and caught their reactions. Watch one minute video here. Of course, they’re all bright. They’re all beautiful – so allow us to introduce a few successful applicants. Their further studies will amplify and advance their impact. Keep your eye on these promising southern Africans.Zoe Postman is a journalist for pro-poor investigative news platform Ground Up. She will be doing a Masters in Political Science in order to investigate how the City of Johannesburg can integrate informal waste pickers into the formal economy. It will ask why the City protects waste companies instead of integrating the services of the “Reclaimers”.Tawanda Matende is doing a doctorate in linguistics. Sign language in Zimbabwe is not a curriculum subject and is not yet described. There is also no movement on the ground geared towards sign language teaching and learning in schools. This study generates awareness on the need for policy, teaching and learning of Zimbabwe Sign Language.Sibonginkosi Mpofu’s PhD is in conflict related sexual violence (CRSV) in Zimbabwe with a focus on the 1980s Gukurahundi genocide. CRSV is a subject that has been ignored in literature and in practice. In Zimbabwe, there has been no mention of these women’s suffering and no plans to bring the perpetrators to justice. Mokgethwa Manaswe will be doing a Masters in Engineering. Her research focuses on renewable ways of producing hydrogen, and explores clean alternative technologies with a low environmental impact.Theodora Talumba is doing her PhD in Human Rights Law on sustainable development for women artisanal miners in Malawi. She addresses women’s rights and mining from the perspective of gender and environmental justice. Tisaukirenji Tembo’s Masters will be in Journalism. Business Journalism is not yet that vibrant in Malawi and most reporters learn to specialise on the job. Tisaukirenji wants to elevate business and economic journalism for her students back in Malawi.

While change is slow, some shifts in attitudes are taking place—and women are standing up to demand their rights. For example, women are working with parliamentarians to advocate for rights for sex workers—a “catalytic” moment for collective organizing in Zimbabwe.

She’s a super model, an actress and t.v personality and having worked with some big names of Nigeria, it’s no doubt Vimbai has represented Zimbabwe so well. Her dark chocolate skin, perfectly chiselled jawline and high cheekbones can simply melt your heart. In a nutshell she’s a winning package

Welcome to the archives of Women’s Advancement Deeply. While we paused regular publication of the site on November 15, 2018, we are happy to serve as an ongoing public resource on women’s economic advancement. We hope you’ll enjoy the reporting and analysis that was produced by our dedicated community of editors and contributors.

Winnet works with Katswe Sistahood, a women’s rights organization that powerfully mobilizes women in Zimbabwe to fight for their sexual and reproductive health. Zimbabwe gained independence from white-minority rule in 1980, but has struggled in recent years under the increasingly autocratic hand of President Robert Mugabe. Political violence and the repression of human rights defenders are commonplace. Women are most impacted by Zimbabwe’s challenges, with a poor economy and high unemployment rate making it difficult for them to provide for their families. On top of that, Zimbabwe is a deeply patriarchal society in which women have limited control over their own bodies. Winnet is determined to challenge these cultural norms, and enable women in Zimbabwe to take control over their own bodies and futures. Some of Winnet’s work focuses on empowering women who have turned to sex work as means of supporting their families. Growing up, Winnet questioned the power imbalance in her family—why the woman’s role was always in the kitchen and as a caretaker. Early on, she also realized that women are at risk in public spaces. One day while she was heading to school with friends, Winnet was arbitrarily arrested on charges of soliciting for sex. Winnet has been arrested three times on similar charges while going to school or simply hailing a taxi. During her detainment, she also faced beatings and harassment. Zimbabwe’s laws make it illegal to solicit for sex, which leaves women vulnerable to police officers who often abuse their powers by detaining women they accuse of being sex workers and then sexually assaulting them. This abuse of powers makes sex workers particularly hesitant to take necessary security precautions. Carrying a condom is used as a proof of a sex worker’s status. Some women won’t carry the condoms, making them vulnerable to disease. And since they are in a hurry to get off the street, they often accept clients quickly—increasing the risk of a violent attack. While change is slow, some shifts in attitudes are taking place—and women are standing up to demand their rights. For example, women are working with parliamentarians to advocate for rights for sex workers—a “catalytic” moment for collective organizing in Zimbabwe. “Once mindsets start shifting, I know we will be able to collectively start doing things that can really change the world.”—Winnet Shamuyarira. Watch Winnet speak about her work LEARN MORE Katswe Sistahood Women of Zimbabwe Rise, Amnesty International TAKE ACTION Katswe Sistahood is a JASS Southern Africa Ally! Donate to JASS! Connect with @NobelWomen and #16Days on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram! Subscribe by email and have a profile delivered to your email inbox each day of the 16 Days of Activism. Meet more amazing women on our blog!

Source: Mcebiscoo.com

About the author

Mc Ebisco

Welcome to Mc Ebisco, I am a blogger and a comedian in Nigeria, My aims and objectives are to share knowledge and varieties of news and information across the globe.

Leave a Reply